Nursing Home Neglect Infectious Disease CRE Bacteria

Nursing Home Neglect Infectious Disease CRE Bacteria

What is CRE?

What is CRE, it is an infectious disease more commonly found in medical and hospital settings, including elder care facilities. It is important to take safety measures to protect residents and healthcare workers from all forms of infectious disease, including staph, MRSA, VRE, C-Diff and CRE.

According to the CDC – CRE, Carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae is a family of germs that are considered difficult treat due to an increased level of resistance to antibiotics. E. coli is an example of a CRE infection.  Usually healthy people do not get infections.  The risk is increased in healthcare and nursing home settings due to people who require ventilators, urinary catheters, or intravenous catheters, and patients who are taking long courses of antibiotics are at the greatest risk.  Here is a link to more resources in Facilities / Settings.

More Information About CRE Infections

Many people enter elder care facilities and although family members and staff are familiar with the risks associated with falls, medication errors, sexual assault, they may not be as aware of the risks associated with infectious disease and the reasonable measures to be taken to reduce the likelihood of exposure and transmission.

There are state and federal regulations which pertain the standards of care for residents for infectious disease and other infections such as UTIs, pressure sores, and post-surgical wounds.   Make sure that the facility caring for your family member is following infectious disease protocols, such as ensuring cleanliness using bleach and other disinfections, use of gloves, masks, special linen protocols and other measures to reduce the spread of infections, and measures to reduce further spreading such as closed wings of the facilities, etc.

If someone you know acquired an infectious disease in a nursing home or other care facility due to a failure to follow protocols for reducing the risk of infectious disease, I recommend you file a complaint with the Department of Health also contact Attorney Kenneth LaBore for more information on the rights of injured residents of nursing homes and their families.   Mr. LaBore can be reached at 612-743-9048 or toll free at 1-888-452-6589 or by email at Ken@MNnursinghomeneglect.com

Disclaimer

Infectious Disease, CRE, CRE, C-Diff, Staph, MRSA

Infectious Disease, CRE, CRE, C-Diff, Staph, MRSA

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Staph Infections in Nursing Homes is a Risk to Watch

Staph – Staphylococcus aureus is a common bacterium found on the skin and in the noses of up to 25% of healthy people and animals. Staphylococcus aureus is important because it has the ability to make seven different toxins that are frequently responsible for food poisoning.  Staph investigations in nursing homes can be greatly reduced with proper hygiene an infectious disease procedures.

11155 lores Staph Infections in Nursing Homes

Information About Staff Infections from the Center for Disease Control

What is Staphylococcus?
What is staphylococcal food poisoning?
What are the symptoms of staphylococcal food poisoning?
How do I know if I have staphylococcal food poisoning?
Is a sick staph patient infectious?
How should a patient with suspected staphylococcal food poisoning be treated?
How can staphylococcal food poisoning be prevented

If you or a loved one has suffered an injury from Staph, C-Diff, MRSA, VRE, CRE or any other infectious disease or other neglect or abuse in a nursing home or other care facility that serves the elderly in Minnesota please contact Attorney Kenneth L. LaBore, directly please send an email to KLaBore@mnnursinghomeneglect.com, or call Ken at 612-743-9048 or call him at his direct toll free number 1-888-452-6589.

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What is a MRSA Infection?

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Scanning electron micrograph (SEM) depicting numerous clumps of MRSA bacteria. Credit: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, NIAID.

MRSA Infection Statistics

In 2010, encouraging results from a CDC study published in the Journal of the American Medical Association showed that invasive (life-threatening) MRSA infections in healthcare settings are declining. Invasive MRSA infections that began in hospitals declined 28% from 2005 through 2008. Decreases in infection rates were even bigger for patients with bloodstream infections.

In addition, the study showed a 17% drop in invasive MRSA infections that were diagnosed before hospital admissions (community onset) in people with recent exposures to healthcare settings. This study (or report) complements data from the National Healthcare Safety Network (NHSN) that found rates of MRSA bloodstream infections occurring in hospitalized patients fell nearly 50% from 1997 to 2007.

Currently the CDC believes about one of three people carry staph in their nose, and 2 in 100 carry MRSA.

MRSA Infection Topics Provided by the Center for Disease Control – Source CDC

hand hygienePrevention

Personal, Healthcare Settings, Athletics, Schools, with advice on environmental cleaning and disinfecting for MRSA

Who is at risk for MRSA? – including nursing homes, assisted living, memory care, group homes and other environments.

medical bagTreatment

What To Do, Clinical Information…

petree dishDiagnosis & Testing

Clinical Diagnosis, Laboratory Information…

line chartStatistics

Statistical Data…

thermometerSymptoms

Skin Infections, Photos, …

peoplePeople at Risk

Personal, Healthcare Settings, Athletics, Schools…

compondsCauses

How MRSA is Spread, Origins…

cleaning productsEnvironmental Cleaning

Disinfectants, Laundry, Athletic Facilities…

booksEducational Resources

General education & Athletic posters…

According to the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Disease, NIAID – MRSA is largely a hospital-acquired infection, in fact, one of the most common. Recently, however, new strains have emerged in the community that are capable of causing severe infections in otherwise healthy people.

If you or a loved one has suffered an injury from Staph, C-Diff, MRSA, VRE, CRE or any other infectious disease or other neglect or abuse in a nursing home or other care facility that serves the elderly in Minnesota please contact Attorney Kenneth L. LaBore, directly please send an email to KLaBore@MNnursinghomeneglect.com, or call Ken at 612-743-9048 or call him at his direct toll free number 1-888-452-6589.

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What are VRE Infections?

PHIL Image 209

VRE Bacterium

VRE Infections – VRE also known as Vancomycin-Resistant Enterococcus (VRE) Infection which is a antimicrobial-resistant bacteria that are resistant to vancomycin, the drug often used to treat infections caused by enterococci.  According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention CDC , enteroccocci are bacteria that are normally present in the human intestines and in the female genital tract and are often found in the environment. These bacteria can sometimes cause infections. Most vancomycin-resistant Enterococci infections occur in hospitals.

VRE Infections- What are the two types of vancomycin resistance in enterococci?

According to the CDC – there are the two types of VRE infections vancomycin resistance in enterococci. The first type is intrinsic resistance. Isolates of Enterococcus gallinarum and E. casseliflavus/E. flavescens demonstrate an inherent, low-level resistance to vancomycin. The second type of vancomycin resistance in enterococci is acquired resistance. Enterococci can become resistant to vancomycin by acquisition of genetic information from another organism. Most commonly, this resistance is seen in E. faecium and E. faecalis, but also has been recognized in E. raffinosus, E. avium, E. durans, and several other enterococcal species. According to National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, Vancomycin-Resistant Enterococci (VRE) – Enterococci are bacteria that are commonly found in the human digestive tract and female genital tract, but do not pose a threat to healthy people. Infections occur more commonly in people who are in hospitals or other healthcare facilities and who may be more susceptible to infection. Healthcare providers commonly use the antibiotic vancomycin to treat infections, but upon exposure, some bacteria will develop or acquire resistance to vancomycin.

If you or a loved one has suffered an injury from Staph, C-Diff, MRSA, VRE, CRE or any other infectious disease or other neglect or abuse in a nursing home or other care facility that serves the elderly in Minnesota please contact  Attorney Kenneth L. LaBore, directly please send an email to KLaBore@MNnursinghomeneglect.com, or call Ken at 612-743-9048 or call him at his direct toll free number 1-888-452-6589.

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Here is some additional information about urinary infections:

UTI Event Reporting – Center for Disease Control and Prevention, CDC, Training Presentation –  Produced by National Healthcare Safety Network.

Urinary Tract Infection (UTI) Event for Long-term Care Facilities, Center for Disease Control and Prevention, CDC – This has excellent protocols for determining the existence of urinary tract infections.

medical report with tubes of blood and urine

Nosocomial Infections What Geriatricians Should Know – American Geriatrics.

Candidiasis Yeast Infection Symptoms and Signs – emedicinehealth.com.

Catheter Urinary Infections

CAUTI Baseline Prevention Practices Assessment Tool – Center for Disease Control and Prevention, CDC.

CAUTI Tool Kit  – Center for Disease Control and Prevention, CDC,

Healthcare-associated Infections (HAIs) – Center for Disease Control and Prevention, CDC – Deals with Prevention of Healthcare Infections.

FAQs about Catheter-Associated Urinary Tract Infections – Center for Disease Control and Prevention, CDC.

Urinary Tract Infections: Indwelling (Foley) Catheter – Northwest Regional Spinal Cord Injury System, University of Washington Rehabilitation Medicine.

Catheter-Associated Urinary Tract Infection – Institute for Healthcare Improvement.

Management of Catheter-Associated Urinary Tract Infection (CAUTI), Barbara W. Trautner, MD, PhD.

Catheter-Associated Urinary Tract Infections (CAUTI) – Health Care-Associated Infections (HAI), The Joint Commission.

If you would like information about elder abuse or neglect including a urinary tract infection, UTI, contact attorney Kenneth LaBore at 612-743-9048 or by email at: : klabore@MNnursinghomeneglect.com

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Infectious Diseases such as C-Diff, MRSA, VRE, Staph and others.

Nursing homes have to take reasonable measures to prevent residents from acquiring infectious diseases such as Staph, C-Diff, MRSA, VRE, CRE and others from other residents in the facility as well as the nursing staff. Although infectious disease is commonly found present in hospitals, nursing homes, assisted living and other elder care facilities, the potential adverse effects from exposure to infectious diseases is often over looked risks for elders. Seniors and  other vulnerable adults, some with compromised immune systems are susceptible to pathogens from other residents who share sources of air, food, water, and health care in a often crowded care facilities. The continual revolving traffic of family, residents, care givers, supplier and support staff are also a source for introduction of infection into the environment.1018465_escherichia_coli

Federal law requires that “each resident must receive and the facility must provide the necessary care and services to attain or maintain the highest practicable physical, mental, and psychosocial well-being, in accordance with the comprehensive assessment and plan of care'”. 42 CFR 483.25.  The nursing home facility must establish and maintain an infection control program designed to provide a safe, sanitary, and comfortable environment and to help prevent the development and transmission of disease and infection. 42 CFR 483.65.

 (a) Infection control program. The facility must establish an infection control program under which it—

(1) Investigates, controls, and prevents infections in the facility;

(2) Decides what procedures, such as isolation, should be applied to an individual resident; and

(3) Maintains a record of incidents and corrective actions related to infections.

(b) Preventing spread of infection. (1) When the infection control program determines that a resident needs isolation to prevent the spread of infection, the facility must isolate the resident.

(2) The facility must prohibit employees with a communicable disease or infected skin lesions from direct contact with residents or their food, if direct contact will transmit the disease.

(3) The facility must require staff to wash their hands after each direct resident contact for which handwashing is indicated by accepted professional practice.

(c) Linens. Personnel must handle, store, process, and transport linens so as to prevent the spread of infection.

Infectious Disease Gloves

Some Common Infectious Diseases Present in Nursing Homes:

C-Diff –Clostridium difficile Infection, (source CDC) – people getting medical care can catch serious infections called healthcare-associated infections (HAIs). While most types of HAIs are declining, one – caused by the germ C. difficile – remains at historically high levels. C. difficile causes diarrhea linked to 14,000 American deaths each year.

Those most at risk are people, especially older adults, who take antibiotics and also get medical care. MRSA – Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in both healthcare and community settings continues to be a high priority for the CDC. VRE – Vancomycin-resistant Enterococci are specific types of antimicrobial-resistant bacteria that are resistant to vancomycin, the drug often used to treat infections caused by enterococci. CRE – Carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae, are a family of germs that are difficult to treat because they have high levels of resistance to antibiotics. Staph – Staphylococcus aureus is a common bacterium found on the skin and in the noses of up to 25% of healthy people and animals. Staphylococcus aureus is important because it has the ability to make seven different toxins that are frequently responsible for food poisoning.

Infection Prevention and Control, from Joint Commission

If you or a loved one has suffered an injury from Staph, C-Diff, MRSA, VRE, CRE or any other infectious disease or other neglect or abuse in a nursing home or other care facility that serves the elderly in Minnesota please contact Attorney Kenneth L. LaBore, directly please send an email to KLaBore@mnnursinghomeneglect.com, or call Ken at 612-743-9048 or call him at his direct toll free number 1-888-452-6589.

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